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Languages of Europe by Totentanz0 Languages of Europe by Totentanz0
Language map of Europe:

GREENLAND - ICELAND - FAROE ISLANDS – NORWAY – DENMARK – SWEDEN - FINLAND
Icelandic, Faroese;
Norwegian (West Norwegian, East Norwegian, Trøndelag Norwegian, North Norwegian) {[link]};
Danish (Eastern Jutlandic [Northern Jutland, Northeastern Jutland, Djursland, Mid-Eastern Jutland], Western Jutlandic [Northwestern Jutland, Mid-Western Jutland, Southwestern Jutland, Southeastern Jutland], Southern Jutlandic [West Southern Jutland, East Southern Jutland], Island Danish [Eastern Zealand, Southern Zealand, Western Zealand, Southern Islands, Southern Funen Islands, Eastern Funen, Western Funen], Bornholmsk) {[link]};
Swedish (Sydsvenska mål - Scanian, Götamål, Svealand Swedish, Norrländska mål, Östsvenska mål, Gutnish) {[link]};
Elfdalian;
Low German.
Sami, Finnish - Meänkieli - Kven.
Inuit.

ESTONIA – LITHUANIA – LATVIA
Estonian - Mulgi - Tarto - Võro - Seto {[link]}, Livonian.
Lithuanian - Samogitian, Latvian - Latgalian.
Polish, Russian.
Swedish.
Karaim.

IRELAND – U.K. - MANN - GUERNSEY - JERSEY
Irish {[link]}, Scottish Gaelic {[link]}, Manx, Welsh, Cornish.
Scots {[link]} - Ulster Scots {[link]}, English.
Jèrriais, Guernésiais, Llanito.

NETHERLANDS – BELGIUM - LUXEMBOURG {[link]}, {[link]}
West Frisian (Skiermûntseagersk, Hylpersk, Skylgersk, Aastersk, Súdwesthoeksk, Noardhoeksk, Klaaifrysk, Wâldfrysk) {[link]};
Low Saxon (Gronings, Stellingwarfs, Drents, Urkers, Sallaans, Tweants, West Veluws, Oost Veluws, Achterhooks) {[link]};
Low Franconian (Brabantian - South Gulderish, West Flemish, East Flemish, Zealandic, Hollandic, Limburgish);
Luxembourgish.
Picardian, Walloon, Champenois, Lorrain.

GERMANY – SWITZERLAND – LIECHTENSTEIN – AUSTRIA {[link]}
Danish;
North Frisian (Sölring, Fering-Öömrang, Halunder, Wiedingharder, Bökingharder, West-Mooring, Ost-Mooring, Karrharder, Norder-Goesharder, Mittel-Goesharder, Süder-Goesharder) {[link]};
Saterland Frisian;
Low German (Schleswigisch, Holsteinisch, East Frisian, Westphalian, Nordniedersächsisch, Eastphalian, Mecklenburgisch-Vorpommersch, Nordmärkisch, Südmärkisch) {[link]};
Low Franconian (Kleverländisch, Limburgish - Ostbergisch){[link]};
Central German (Ripuarian, Moselle Franconian, Hessian, Palatinate German, Thuringian, Upper Saxon, Lusatian, Berlin-Brandenburgish) {[link]};
High Franconian (Erzgebirgisch, East Franconian, South Franconian) {[link]};
Alemannic (Swabian, Upper Rhine Alemannic, Lake Constance Alemannic, High Alemannic, Highest Alemannic) {[link]};
Bavarian (Northern Austro-Bavarian, Central Austro-Bavarian, Southern Austro-Bavarian) {[link]}.
Frainc-Comtou, Arpitan, Western Lombard, Romansh (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) {[link]}.
Lower Sorbian {[link]}, Upper Sorbian, Burgenland Croatian, Slovene.

PORTUGAL – SPAIN – ANDORRA
Portuguese, Galician {[link]}, Fala, Asturian - Leonese - Extremaduran - Mirandese {[link]};
Castilian (North, Southern) - Andalusian {[link]}, Aragonese - Benasqués {[link]};
Catalan (Northern Catalan, Central Catalan, Balearic, North-Western Catalan, Valencian) {[link]}, Aranese.
Basque (Biscayan, Gipuzkoan, Upper Navarrese, Navarrese-Lapurdian, Souletin) {[link]}, Silbo Gomero.

FRANCE - MONACO
Occitan (Gascon, Lengadocian, Provençal, Lemosin, Auvernhat, Vivaroalpenc, Crescent) {[link]};
Arpitan {[link]};
Oïl languages (Burgundian, Frainc-Comtou, Lorrain, Champenois, Walloon, Picard, Norman, Orleanais, Berrichon, Bourbonnais, Angevin, Galo, Poitevin, Saintongeais) {[link]};
Catalan, Ligurian - Monégasque, Corsican (Cismontano Capocorsino, Cismontano, Transizione Cismontano/Oltramontano, Oltramontano, Oltramontano Sartenese) {[link]}.
West Flemish, Central German, High Franconian, Alemannic - Alsatian.
Basque, Breton (Leoneg, Tregerieg, Gwenedeg, Kerneve) {[link]}.

ITALY – SAN MARINO – VATICAN – MALTA {[link]}
Occitan - Gardiol;
Arpitan - Faetar;
Gallo-Italic (Ligurian - Tabarchino, Piedmontese, Lombard [Eastern Lombard, Western Lombard], Emilian [Bolognese, Ferrarese, Modenese, Reggiano, Parmigiano, Piacentino, Mantovano, Carrarese, Oltrepadano], Romagnol, Gallo-Sicilian, Gallo-Italico di Basilicata);
Venetian - Veneto-Pontino;
Ladin (Fascian, Gherdëina, Maréo/Badiot, Fodom, Anpezan) - Nones - Solandro {[link]}, Friulian;
Tuscan - Bagitto - Gallo-Toscano, Corsican (Capraiese, Gallurese, Castellanese, Sassarese);
Sardinian (Logudorese, Nuorese, Campidanese) {[link]};
Algherese;
Italiano Meridionale-estremo (Sicilian, Southern Calabro, Salentino, Cilentano) {[link]};
Neapolitan (Abruzzese, Molisano, Pugliese, Campano, Lucano) {[link]};
Central Italian {[link]}, Latin.
Walser (Tisch, Töitschu), Bavarian (Southern Austro-Bavarian, Cimbrian, Mócheno, Sappadino, Saurano, Timavese, Carinziano della Valcanale).
Slovene - Resian, Molise Croatian.
Griko Salentino, Greek–Calabrian, Arbëresh, Maltese.

SLOVENIA – CROATIA – BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA – SERBIA - KOSOVO - MONTENEGRO
Slovene - Prekmurian {[link]}, Croatian - Bosnian - Serbian - Montenegrin {[link]}, Slovak, Pannonian Rusyn.
Istriot, Istro-Romanian, Trentino, Romanian.
German, Gheg.

GREECE – ALBANIA – REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA – BULGARIA – CYPRUS - TURKEY
Modern Greek (Northern, Ionian-Peloponnesian, Cretan-Cycladian, South-eastern) {[link]}, Tsakonian, Maniot, Pontic Greek.
Gheg, Tosk, Arvanitika. {[link]}
Aromanian {[link]}, Megleno-Romanian, Italkian, Judaeo-Spanish.
Macedonian, Bulgarian (Transitional, Northwestern, Southwestern, Rup, Balkan, Moesian) [link], Slavic dialects of Greece.
Turkish, Kurdish, Laz.

HUNGARY – ROMANIA – MOLDOVA
Hungarian (Western, Trans-Danubian, Southern, Northwestern, Tisza, Northeastern, Plain, Székely), Romanian, German, Gagauz.
Prekmurian, Serbian, Rusyn, Russian, Ukrainian.

POLAND – CZECH REPUBLIC – SLOVAKIA {[link]}
Polish (New mixed dialects, Greater Polish, Masovian, Lesser Polish), Kashubian, Silesian, Góralski, Czech, Slovak (Western, Central, Eastern), Rusyn - Lemko.
German - Silesian German, Vilamovian.
Hungarian.

BELARUS – UKRAINE – RUSSIA
Belarusian {[link]}, Ukrainian, Russian, Polish, Rusyn {[link]}.
Lithuanian, Romanian, Crimean Tatar, Swedish.
Hungarian, Sami, Karelian, Votic, Ingrian, Veps, Nenets, Komi, Mansi, Khanty.
Udmurt, Mari, Moksha, Erzya.
Armenian, Adygey, Cherkess, Karachay, Balkar, Kabardin, Ossetian, Ingush, Chechen, Nogay, Kumyk, Avar, Lak, Dargin, Rutul, Agul, Tabasaran, Lezgin, Kalmyk, Azeri.

KAZAKHSTAN - UZBEKISTAN - TURKMENISTAN
Kazakh, Russian, Karakalpak, Turkmen, Uzbek.

GEORGIA – ARMENIA - AZERBAIJAN {[link]}
Abkhaz, Georgian, Ossetian, Modern Greek, Armenian, Kurdish, Azeri, Avar, Lezgin, Russian, Talysh, Tsakhur.

IRAN – AFGHANISTAN
Persian, Kurdish, Azeri, Talysh, Gilaki, Mazandarani, Bashkardi, Balochi.

AFRICA – ARABIAN PENINSULA – LEVANT
Arabic, Berber (Chenoua, Kabyle, Chaouia, Siwa, Tuareg…), Hebrew, Kurdish.

----------------------------------------------
-Italic languages: [link]
-Germanic languages: [link]
-Slavic languages: [link]
-Graeco-Armenian languages: [link]
-Celtic languages: [link]
-Baltic languages: [link]
-Uralo-Siberian languages: [link]
Add a Comment:
 
:iconlord-pumkin:
LORD-PUMKIN Featured By Owner May 14, 2017
everybody talk turkish in the turkey
Reply
:iconneneveh:
Neneveh Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2016  Hobbyist Artist
I absolutely love this map! Although, as someone of Sami ancestry, I'm slightly disappointed that you simply rumped all of the Sami languages together, even though each one is as different as Norse and Danish. I suppose this was to make the map simpler, which as a map maker myself I completely understand. Keep up the incredible work, and I'm looking forward to seeing other continents!
Reply
:iconhatsforclowns:
hatsforclowns Featured By Owner Aug 17, 2016
Not to piss in your beer, but Finland has four Norse languages with different origins, histories, and development:

(1) Ostrobothnian (parts of Ostrobothnia); (2) Ålandish (Åland); (3) Pernesian (parts of Åboland and Nyland); (4) Finland-Swedish (all other speakers)
Reply
:iconhanestetico:
hanestetico Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2016
I speak Gallo-Italico from Basilicata :)
Reply
:icongreavyard:
Greavyard Featured By Owner Edited Oct 19, 2015
All of bielorussia is now bi-linguistic, northernmost Ukraine is also bi-linguistic or middle-linguistic, whatever.

Divide the "Ukranian" in two language and various dialects too!

EDIT: Germans in Romania are a very little minority
Mark the Arab dialects, It's a clusterfuck but I believe you can do it!
Wales is weird, half of it speaks welsh now, google the lastest maps!
There are way more russian speakers in both Latvia and Estonia, there are no Ingrian speakers at all!
There are almost no Flemish speakers in France today! Rek this up, Frenk is 100% pure!
Why does Spanish touches the Pyrenees? That makes no sense, that is Aragonese territory!
Why so many arabs at Iran? www.geocurrents.info/cultural-…
Where is the multi-diverse area in Ukranian Bessarabia?
Where are the russian dialects comrade?

REMOVE ESTONIANS FROM WESTERN LATVIA. WHAT ARE YOU, SOME KIND OF WIKIPEDIA?
Reply
:iconrageponypl:
RagePonyPL Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2015  Hobbyist Filmographer
DIALECTS! NO LANGUAGES! Do you think mazovian is other than lesser polish? Micro different.
Reply
:icongreavyard:
Greavyard Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2015
"A language is an dialect with an army and state"

Welcome to linguistics comrade! We are all splitters here!
Reply
:iconsewandrere:
sewandrere Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Very nice, missing Cornish though but still very nice!!
Reply
:icongreavyard:
Greavyard Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2015
They have resurrected it some time ago!
Reply
:iconmaine86:
Maine86 Featured By Owner May 9, 2015
So Ireland is overwheimgly English-speaking? There's sth wrong about this map...
Reply
:icongreavyard:
Greavyard Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2015
It is! Irish is barely spoken, sad truth :(
Reply
:iconmaine86:
Maine86 Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2015
If England and Ireland are overwhelmingly English-speaking, then France should be overwhelmingly French-speaking (including Corsica). The guy who made that map is just ignorant (no offense).
Reply
:icongreavyard:
Greavyard Featured By Owner Edited Oct 27, 2015
Happends that in France there are rural regions where Occitan is still spoken.
While that in Ireland Irish is all but dead.
Reply
:iconmaine86:
Maine86 Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2015
I guess you don't know France. This map is wrong on so many levels.
Reply
:iconmezh-ar-vro:
Mezh-Ar-Vro Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
 I love you for making this map :'3 <3
Reply
:iconthedoraemons7:
thedoraemons7 Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2013
Wow wow... I'm so surprised about that, but Europe looks like has a lot of ethnic people.
Reply
:iconfusyke:
Fusyke Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013
thx that you had marked the hungarians in transilvania , respect
Reply
:iconhezzoissmart:
HezzoIsSmart Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2012
English
Scottish Gaelic
Swedish
Spanish
Reply
:iconwalterkarsemeijer:
WalterKarsemeijer Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
In the Netherlands dialects have all but vanished. People in norhern and eastern parts of the country don't speak German as their native language....
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
They don't speak German. They speak Dutch Low Saxon: [link]
Reply
:iconwalterkarsemeijer:
WalterKarsemeijer Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
Only older people still speak those dialects these days. How do you explain Northern Germany having the same colours as the eastern Netherlands? Dutch saxon dialects sound very different from the German versions.
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
Dutch Low Saxon is part of the West Low German group: [link] so it has the same color as other dialects of northern Germany. Being spoken in the Netherlands, a strong Dutch influence over lexicon and orthography is not surprising.
Reply
:iconwalterkarsemeijer:
WalterKarsemeijer Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
The same page also includes the fact that onlt 15% of the adults and 1% of the children use the dialect in their common conversations with friends and family in those regions. Therfore I would include the Netherlands and Flanders the same colour, since the majority in all regions there speak Dutch as their first language. Flemish and Dutch people can have normal conversations without any trouble understanding each other. I think a few words may differ depending on what region you're in at the most.
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2014
I think he just made the native dialects, of course dialects are dieing,
so he could also make all of Germany in the same colour, since the majority
speaks High-German.

Anyway Dutch is just a lower franconian and lower saxonian german dialect,
having the status of an own language, because it has an own state.
Reply
:iconwalterkarsemeijer:
WalterKarsemeijer Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2014
Well, Dutch enjoys the official status of a language because it is, according to the many experts who research the subject. Features like the Dutch "G" are an example of how it is too different to be a dialect. I think that in the past "Dutch" may have been more like a German dialect, especially in medieval times. 

Also Arminius of the Cherusci has nothing to do with 1871.
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2014
Dutch is a german nether-franconian dialect that didn´t take part in forming the modern High-German,
that´s why it´s so similar. The Northgermans in the border regions can easily understand them.

Arminius has to do a lot with 1871, he was our first hero and he inspired his descendants to form an united Empire.
So why do you troll my nickname? Do you have a problem?
Reply
(1 Reply)
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Oct 15, 2012
So you're basically suggesting almost monochromatic France, Germany, Poland, Sweden and so on? Not that it would be wrong. Simply my map has a different (but coexisting and non-conflicting) approach.
Reply
:iconwalterkarsemeijer:
WalterKarsemeijer Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2014
I'm suggesting that the titel should be altered to "languages/dialects of Europe", since "languages of Europe" can make it seem as if European countries have a complete lack of unity when it comes to the spoken language. ;) 

You could also look at the languages which have been recognised as not being a mere "dialect" and make a map of those. In the Benelux for example Dutch can be split in a Northern and Southern form, roughly. Frysian enjoys the status of an official language. (Frysians hate it when you call their speech a dialect:P

I think you're right about the Limburgish, since it really differs a lot from Dutch.
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Feb 28, 2014
Unfortunately the boundary between a 'language' and a 'dialect' is far from being that clear:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language…
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialect#…
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_langua…
I'd also like to emphasize that there are no particular messages or strong emotions behind my maps.
Reply
:iconcaucasianeagle:
CaucasianEagle Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2012
The Map is incorrect. Lezgins also primordially live in the north of Azerbaijan. there 2 areas where are no Azeri-Turkic!!!
Reply
:icontodyo1798:
Todyo1798 Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Ulstr-Scots is a dialect, not a language. Seriously it's English with an accent most foreigners can barely understand, but it is English nonetheless.
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2012
The distinction between "dialect" & "language" is probably just a matter of terminology. Classification of languages itself is a very difficoult and nebulous subject.
Reply
:icontodyo1798:
Todyo1798 Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
True enough I suppose, though few people in Northern Ireland would credit them as a language.
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2012
Sure. But I want to make it clear that I‘m not advocating that Ulster Scots is a “language” or a "dialect".
...
...
But, on second thought... [link] [link]
Reply
:iconthearesproject:
TheAresProject Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2012
Meänkieli isn't that widespread. I don't think many people in Kiruna speak it; that region should be mostly Swedish-speaking, with pockets of Sami here and there.
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2012
Sure. Indeed, most of the people of northern Sweden speak standard Swedish. This map is meant to show dialectal varieties and traditional regional languages. There is a great difference between them and official standard languages.
Also, history plays an important role in the definitions of these concepts. Imagine that a lot of Welsh immigrants suddently settled in Northern Sweden. That would not change the regional linguistic dialects of the area. But, during centuries, they could create a stabile community merging with the autochtone population or displacing it and develope an independent dialect of Welsh or an innovative variation of Swedish with Welsh charatteristics.
The same applies to France. This map doesn’t claim that all of the people of southern France homogeneously speak Occitan. As you’ve probably noticed, most of the standard languages aren’t even mentioned.
That said, you’re right: it could be better to show some (small) areas where Meänkieli is stronger surrounded by the local Nybyggarmål variety of Swedish. But I wasn’t able to find a more precise map of Meänkieli areas (the map I used should be from here: [link] ). That's a common problem for minority languages spoken in sparsely populated areas.
Reply
:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2011
It looks like a pretty confusing map. But should it surprise me that England and Portugal seem to have the cleanest look, language-wise?
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2011
Sorry for the confusion… I had problems with the choice of colors and I wasn’t able to make a proper legend (but hey, try to put numbers in this map to differentiate the dialects of Ladin or Romansh and then come back :-P).
Your surprise is justified. AFAIK, Portugal is linguistically very homogeneous but it has its own dialects, like every language. I was recently able to find some good maps (ex: [link] ). As regards England, in my book “Encyclopedia of the Languages of Europa” (edited by Glanville Price) there’s a nice map of traditional English dialect areas. The problem is that I currently don’t have a clear familiarity with the dialect subdivision of European English (also considering that there isn’t just one definite system). I had a similar problem with Germany. I’m also not entirely satisfied with the subdivision of ex-Yugoslavia…
As an excuse for my negligence, I can say that I’m working on an updated (and bigger) version of this map!
Reply
:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2011
Just tidy the colors up a bit and it'll be awesome! :D
Reply
:icontombombardier:
TomBombardier Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2011
Could you do one expanded further east? This would be perfect for a map on a Soviet Union that didnæt completely fall apart.
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2011
I was thinking about expanding this map, but my knowledge about languages of Russia/Central Asia is not particularly firm. The linguistic situation of Asia is much more intricate than in Europe (at least to me) and it's not always easy to find reliable data about it.
Reply
:icontombombardier:
TomBombardier Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2011
It would be a very worthwhile project. What if one were able to get you enough maps of the regions and the claims to languages of the areas?
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2011
Well, it could be feasible... but probably only in the long term!
The map & colours to be used and the legend would also be quite problematic...
Reply
:iconduende01:
duende01 Featured By Owner May 17, 2011  Hobbyist Writer
I have a lot of respect for you. This is wonderfully detailed and accurate.

Do you study languages/ geolinguistics?
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner May 18, 2011
Thanks! You're making me blush... (。◕‿◕。 )
I'm not a student of languages / geolinguistics (I'm actually a student of medicine), just an amateur.
Reply
:iconduende01:
duende01 Featured By Owner May 18, 2011  Hobbyist Writer
No! That's really cool. Your other maps are very informative and thorough as well. XD Good luck for the future, especially with medicine- it sounds very difficult.
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner May 19, 2011
;-)
Reply
:icongrashcoy:
Grashcoy Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2011
Amazing, I thought I'd never see some map like this, I've been looking for it since quite a while, thanks for making this wonderful map it's quite complete.
Reply
:icontotentanz0:
Totentanz0 Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2011
Thanks! (^し^)
Reply
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